An Insider’s Guide to Washington, D.C.

By Matt Swenson, March 30, 2016

With the cherry blossoms come scores of leisure tourists and high hotel rates that planners and attendees would be wise to avoid when considering Washington, D.C. That’s not to say the nation’s capital is not a great destination for an event, but a few poor choices can turn the experience sour—take it from someone who was born and raised in the area, and lived there for a decade post-college. In other words, take it from me, as well as this advice, for doing D.C. the right away.

1. Fall for the fall. As mentioned, spring is when cherry blossoms and tourism bloom in D.C. To minimize waits at some of the city’s landmark locations, try another season. Fall, for instance, has pleasant temperatures and little precipitation.

2. Keep it close. One of the best aspects of Washington is it’s a major city that isn’t very big. That means you can plan many of your events within walking distance, thus cutting down on cab costs and ensuring attendees won’t get caught in a Metro delay.

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