5 Things to Include in an Emergency Plan

By Matt Swenson, November 1, 2015

Ready to write that emergency plan, but don’t know where to start? Here’s an outline of the basic emergency playbook.

Contact information: You’ll need phone numbers of the local mayor, police chief, fire chief and any other local officials affiliated with the event to get up-to-the-minute information.

Phone tree: Just as information must go up, it must go down. How is your organization going to relay details and plans? Everyone involved must know his or her role.

Power points: If power goes out citywide, which hotels and other venues have generators to support electricity?

Evacuation routes: If an event requires a fast exit, you won’t have time to study Google Maps. Staff needs to know where to go and how to get there before a potential disaster occurs.

Media plan: Getting the word out means partnering with the media. News reports can relay updates on traffic, weather and police activity. Bigger picture, sending the right message can put fears at rest, prevent cancellations and keep the show going.

Photo Credit: Visit Baltimore

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