New Rules of Revelry: Alchemy Event Studio

By Elizabeth Schulte Roth, January 18, 2017

Screen Shot 2016-07-27 at 11.01.14 PMThe duo behind Alchemy Event Studio likes to approach events from a different perspective than many planners. “Everyone’s been to a dinner; everyone’s been to a meeting—how do we make it different?” That’s the question that creatives Amy Saltzman and Kate Stone, founders of Alchemy Event Studio, ask themselves to better serve their Southern clients. They specialize in clever little details that make a party so personal, so it’s no surprise their fans include everyone from billionaire retail CEOs to the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks. Lately, they are guided by their favorite phrase: Why not? “Don’t think you can’t do it that way because others aren’t doing it that way,” says Saltzman. They share three new rules for revelry.

When it comes to food, you can go high and low.

Getting creative with F&B elements is one aspect of gatherings where Alchemy thrives. For a spirited Fortune 500 company’s holiday event, Alchemy crafted a mobile, 6-ft.-tall fir tree made from dowel rods on big rolling casters and covered each rod with hot Krispy Kreme doughnuts. “People were rolling the doughnut tree around and taking pictures in front of it, posting them on social media and branding their experience,” says Saltzman. When attendees left the event, they were given hot cones of French fries from The Fry Guy food truck at the valet. “You want to make sure guests eat when there is an open bar,” Saltzman adds.

When Krug Champagne wanted to introduce its president and CEO, Maggie Henriquez, to a select audience, Alchemy created an intimate affair at a private home in Atlanta. “She’s a fascinating woman from Venezuela who went to Harvard, lives in Paris and runs a classic European vintner, and this was her first visit to Georgia,” Stone says. For the night’s F&B, each of the six courses was paired with a vintage Krug. “It wasn’t a place for collards or pimento cheese,” says Stone. Alchemy asked the chef to create a lobster arepa, a nod to the classic Venezuelan dish, which Henriquez praised as the best she’d ever had. “She knew we wanted to make her feel comfortable, so it was Southern hospitality in our own, atypical way,” Saltzman shares. “It got Henriquez talking to guests about her life, which made for a fabulous evening.”

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