To Plan or Not to Plan: Organized Leisure

By Stephanie Davis Smith, April 20, 2016

Should you map out free time, or organized leisure, for attendees? Finding many meeting participants go back to their rooms to check emails in lieu of networking and enjoying a host city, many planners are starting to slot organized leisure instead of personal time on agendas. Organized leisure can be an optional guided foodie or bike tour, golf or tennis outing, or even a block of spa appointments set aside for attendees at a discounted rate (leaving the cost of these items to the individual).

Diana Hakenholz, CMP, director of meetings for Association of Collegiate Conference and Events Directors–International, took a ’Burgh Bits & Bites guided food tour arranged through Visit Pittsburgh. “I am a foodie and this was a creative way of getting to know Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods and history while sampling local culinary specialties.”

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