5 Tips for Avoiding Burnout

By Channing Muller, September 12, 2017

4. Mix up the vendors you work with at each event.

It’s not uncommon to have a set list of vendors you like to work with and continually go back to with each event. But having a diverse list of preferred vendors across all specialities keeps the creative juices flowing and makes every event seem like a new planning experience.

5. Don’t overcommit yourself to networking or professional development events. 

What makes event professionals good at our jobs is we love events. That love can often extend to not being able to turn down any networking, social or professional development opportunity. Industry networking events tie back into work, so you are never fully relaxed like you would be if you went out to dinner with your family. Over time, these events start to weigh on you and can lead to burnout with the industry as a whole.

Keep your passion for events alive for the long haul by knowing when to say no and when to pass the lead to someone else. Make time for yourself and you’ll bring more to the table in your role.

Channing Muller is the principal and founder of DCM Communications, a marketing consulting firm based out of Washington, D.C. With more than 15 years of experience in marketing, advertising, magazine editorial and business development, she works with event professionals to grow and scale their businesses through one-on-one and group coaching.

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