How to Get Better Event Photography

By Leigh Harper, March 28, 2017

4.  Plan different POVs.

Mix things up by shifting perspectives. Ask your photographer to take shots from the audience level, the side of the room, through the crowd or behind the speaker, for example. “Conference photos can get boring,” says Myers. “Spaces like ballrooms aren’t usually well-lit, so approaching it from a creative place is key.”

Savas relies on high-tech equipment to help him get those creative shots. He brings a rolling cart filled with gear like GoPros and drones to every event. Ask your photographer how he or she plans to produce work that will showcase your event and not just document it.

5.  Timing is everything.

Don’t forget to have your photographer capture downtime too. “The candid stuff happens during breaks, and those are the shots people end up really happy with,” says Myers.

A better time for photographers to pause is during meals, says Savas, adding, “No one is ever happy with shots of people eating.” (If you’ve every been captured midbite, you know what he means.) Savas recommends including specific times for your photographer to break or shift gears. Doing so will only improve your finished product.

(Visited 42 times, 1 visits today)

Presenting our 2018 holiday gift guide for the on-the-go professionals.

Groups can retreat from the cold inside The Godfrey Hotel Chicago’s heated igloos.

From learning a new language to getting compensation for lost luggage, here are six free apps you didn’t know you needed.

Get to know the real Dave Weil at SmithBucklin—we have 25 things about the 25-year industry veteran that we are sure you didn't know... yet.

Wisconsin’s Door Peninsula is cool for groups willing to brave winter’s elements for teambuilding activities.

Many traditions born from startup culture go far beyond mere incentives in order to honor each individual employee’s contribution and dedication to the

Christy Lamagna adds to her impressive resume with Crown Plaza Meetings Mentors program.

Jennifer Collins, president and CEO of JDC Events, discusses the power of events in her book, “Events Spark Change: A Guide to Designing Powerful and

Jenn Heinold, senior vice president of events at Access Intelligence, discusses how she stays ahead of the curve planning events for five different markets.

The Latest