How to Get Better Event Photography

By Leigh Harper, March 28, 2017

4.  Plan different POVs.

Mix things up by shifting perspectives. Ask your photographer to take shots from the audience level, the side of the room, through the crowd or behind the speaker, for example. “Conference photos can get boring,” says Myers. “Spaces like ballrooms aren’t usually well-lit, so approaching it from a creative place is key.”

Savas relies on high-tech equipment to help him get those creative shots. He brings a rolling cart filled with gear like GoPros and drones to every event. Ask your photographer how he or she plans to produce work that will showcase your event and not just document it.

5.  Timing is everything.

Don’t forget to have your photographer capture downtime too. “The candid stuff happens during breaks, and those are the shots people end up really happy with,” says Myers.

A better time for photographers to pause is during meals, says Savas, adding, “No one is ever happy with shots of people eating.” (If you’ve every been captured midbite, you know what he means.) Savas recommends including specific times for your photographer to break or shift gears. Doing so will only improve your finished product.

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